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Just Sayin'-More Important Than Ever: Communication

Posted By: Sharon Dillard AANM Newsletter ,

More Important Than Ever: Communication

                                                    

          

Whether you have 5 employees or 5,000 employees, when a business suffers from poor communication among employees, it’s usually the result of management failures. Misunderstandings, frustration, poor performance, and staff turnover happen because employees don’t feel like they—and their opinions—matter.

So how do you fix that? As it turns out, it takes a little time and elbow grease. Here are a few helpful hints to help you better communicate with your staff:

Personal Touches Matter. In this age of electronic communication, far too many of us use our business emails or texts as a substitute for personal interaction. And with physical distancing and wearing masks, it’s harder than ever to connect in person.  While people relate to one another better when they can read each other’s body language and hear tonal inflections, if face-to-face communication isn’t possible, try using a video conferencing service like Zoom or Teams.

Be Available. We’re all guilty of getting so caught up in our own tasks that we forget who’s helping us reach our goals. Your employees should feel like they work with you, not for you. Carve time out of your schedule for regular one-on-one and group employee meetings, and let your staff know they can bring up any questions and concerns they have.

Set Clear Expectations. When you give instructions or discuss a business situation, don’t assume that everyone understands you perfectly. Instead, ask whether you’ve been clear or if further information or explanation is necessary. On the flip side, don’t be afraid to ask questions yourself when there’s something you don’t understand. If you hear something that confuses you, ask. Maybe you missed a detail or maybe you remembered something others forgot. Chances are if you’re confused, others are too.

Be Consistent. While it’s impossible to always have an upbeat attitude, you owe it to your employees to not take your frustrations and worries out on them. You can’t be nice one day and bite someone’s head off the next, no matter how frustrated or tired you are. You will be feared instead of admired, which leads to people shutting down communication with you others.

Give Feedback. Annual performance evaluations are a valuable communication tool, but don’t limit feedback to a once-a-year event. When you give on-going, constructive feedback, employees can develop and improve throughout the year. Focus on situations as they arise, while they’re still fresh. Point out the positive as well as the negative.

Thank and Reward. The words “please,” “thank you,” and “you’re welcome” show that you appreciate a person’s effort. When you consistently emphasize and reward achievements with private accolades and in groups meetings, this positive reinforcement goes a long way in business. A simply thank you shows you respect and value your employees, especially during difficult times like these.

Listen. Effective listening is the most difficult communication technique of all. By listening to others you show respect. Same with not interrupting. You have two ears and one mouth for a reason. You like when people listen to you, so offer the same curtesy.

Your ability to communicate effectively with your staff is the difference between success and simply “getting by,” and it doesn’t happen by accident. It requires effort, time, and learning how and what matters to your employees. When you use these communication tips, your relationships will improve. Just sayin’.

about the author

Sharon Dillard is the award winning CEO & Co-founder of Get A Grip Inc., a national franchise and bathroom resurfacing company based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. For more information call, click, or visit:

call 505.268.0929 ≈ office & showroom: 8905 Adams Street NE, Albuquerque, NM 87113 ≈

Email: sharon@getagripinc.com

Website: ‘Get A Grip’ http://www.getagripabq.com/

Website: ‘Grip Gear’ http://getgripgear.com 

Blogs: ‘Just Sayin’ http://www.sharonjustsayin.com/

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